Male champions! Plus porn for women!

Cardiff Women’s Aid are recruiting men to take part in a ground-breaking training course to explore the effects that gender stereotypes have in their own communities; enabling them to challenge restrictive gender norms and discriminatory attitudes.

By becoming a Champion they will promote healthy, equal relationships in their personal and professional lives; helping to end Violence against Women and Girls.

The closing date for applications onto the summer 2012 training course is 20 July. You can email womensrightsworker@cardiffwomensaid.org.uk if you’re interested.

Sounds like an awesome project!

The Fifty Shades of Grey debate is still going strong, with my friend the Thrifty Mum having already dispensed with the novel after very few pages from the sound of it! I look forward to hearing more about its dubious merits from Michelle, though I’m not sure if it’ll get in to her top 100 things to be grateful about! Funny post from Paige S here looking at aspects of literary porn and how that hardly ever mirrors reality (especially concerning the power of the nips!), I imagine this is the tip of the iceberg in terms of Fifty Shades of Grey!

Vagenda have also posted on the New Statesman’s blog about porn for women! Funny read again, I leave you with:

Of course, there are some directors out there making “feminist porn” (a man and a woman meet at Planet Organic after a gender studies lecture, discuss intersectionality over vegetarian food, and then go back to her flat to bone on last Sunday’s Observer), but the films they are making are but tiny fishing boats beating against a swelling tide of bumming on sofas from Argos.

Following my previous post on the EU’s dodgy science ad, here‘s some more positive stuff from Soapbox Science, who are challenging why more women don’t get involved in science by looking at gender norms. Thanks to Catherine Gregory, my feminist role model for the heads up!

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4 thoughts on “Male champions! Plus porn for women!

  1. The Thrifty Mum says:

    Really interesting pieces here. And I’ve laughed until my stomach hurt at that Vagenda quote!

    For me this all highlights a bizarre double standard. If women sit on the bus / in the staff room during a break / in Starbucks reading it fine! It’s hilarious! We can all have a great laugh and read pages out loud! But if Bob and his mates from accounts started reading Playboy openly and sharing their favourite bits we would be disgusted!!

    • Its weird isn’t it? Maybe its something to do with imagery as to why its acceptable but Playboy isn’t – no pics?

      There’s something odd about our approach to reading – what are we happy to be seen with? Seen boat loads of copies of 50 Shades of Grey about, but then people buy adult versions of Harry Potter books because they’re too embarassed to be seen with a children’s books?!

      • The Thrifty Mum says:

        Good point about there being no photos = ok. The words are completely graphic though – should there be PG, 15, 18 ratings on books? Never thought I’d hear myself say something like this – but – a child/teen could easily pick it up (I sound like my mum).

        Ha! Love the idea that people are happier for other people to know they’re reading porn than a kid’s book! When I bought the book the woman on the checkout told me she’s reading it and how much she was enjoying it, couldn’t put it down and wanted her own Mr Grey. I feel quite weird about that now having (half) read the book and knowing how graphic it is – since when did people share with strangers that they like things like that?!

  2. Interesting thinking about how they should be rated. Agree that its definitely not appropriate for children! But also can’t help thinking that there’s lots of amazing books that deal with some epic themes that have some sex in, would they be restricted? I can honestly say the most messed up book I’ve ever read is American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis, but its free for anyone to buy. Is that ok? But then its also a modern classic. Does that come into it? Maybe if the sex or violence is the narrative (like in Fifty Shades of Grey) then its a rubbish book and usually sinks without a trace. But not this one for some reason!

    I know what you mean about discussing the book, can’t say there’s many people I’d want to talk candidly about those themes! That would definitely make me feel very uncomfortable!

    Zoe William wrote an interesting piece in the Guardian the other day – kinda deals with a lot of the themes we’re talking about! http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012/jul/06/why-women-love-fifty-shades-grey.

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